Category Archives: Health

DAY 3: Eating on £1 per Day

I’m just about finished with Day Three of eating for £1 a day.  I am starting to get into the flow of how this all works.  The eating itself is actually getting easier, but two things I’ve noticed which are different than my typical routine:

  1. How much I think about food. At night I think about what my next day’s meals will be. The next morning, I have to remember to bring my Tupperware of lunch with me in the morning. At lunch and during the afternoon, I think about what I am going to make for dinner. And every once in a while, I worry that I will run out of food before the week is over — not a nice feeling.
  2. How much time I spend actually making food. Cooking two meals a day (breakfast and dinner) takes a lot more time than I remembered.  Having gotten out of the habit of cooking so often during the week, I find myself consciously rearranging plans to make sure I can be home in time to eat.  I even skipped an after-work lecture tonight because of it.

As for meals, I had a good breakfast of porridge and a frozen banana which I’d stuck in the freezer on Sunday because they were already getting too ripe (You could buy twice as many ripe bananas for the same price). And for lunch, I had more leftovers of my lentil and rice concoction.

Dinner was, again, surprisingly good.  I ended up straining the last bits of lentil stew along with my remaining half tin of baked beans in order to separate the beans from the liquids. Once the liquid was separated, I took leftover boiled potatoes from Tuesday’s dinner and mashed all of the solids up together into two vegetarian patties.

Straining lentils and beansSolids and liquids separated

I dry-fried the bean patties and warmed up the sauce and some frozen mixed vegetables.  It was actually really good and cost less than 50p to make.

Bean patties with mixed vegetables

Role of Technology

My broader reflection for today is on the role of technology in helping us eat well.  I used my freezer to keep my bananas from spoiling, I used my refrigerator to store my leftover lentils, I transported my lunch in plastic Tupperware (which was reheated in a microwave) , and I crisped up my bean patties on a non-stick pan (to avoid the cost of expensive cooking oil).

We forget how much of a role technology plays in our food storage, transport and preparation.  For many farmers in the developing world, this is not their reality.  While we waste about a third of our food (yes, a third) as consumer waste, farmers in developing countries lose between 5 -30% due to poor or non-existing storage and transport in what is called “post-harvest losses“.  In other words, they bag up their maize (or whatever other crop they’ve grown) after harvest, but it gets attacked by pests and diseases like rats or molds before it can get eaten.  Or there’s no good road to transport the crops to markets so it spoils before it can be sold.  In my view, this is one of the most important and challenging problems that the agricultural world should address (perhaps second only to increasing agricultural productivity).

Thank you, Tupperware, non-stick pan, refrigerator and freezer and, yes, even the microwave.

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DAY 2: Eating on £1 per Day

Day Two of eating on only £1 per day went quite well.  I felt full and satisfied, if only a little bored or constrained by the lack of options.

For lunch, I had the leftover lentil stew and rice concoction that I had made for dinner the previous night.

Lentil stew with rice_£1 a day

Not great surprises in the recipe — lentils, water, salt/pepper and the frozen mixed vegetables for the stew and steamed rice — except for the fact that I could turn to my herb garden for a bunch of fresh rosemary and then also fresh chives for mixing in with the rice and over the top at the end.

Gardening at home

Having a herb garden has made a big difference already, and coincidentally home gardens are also one of the best ways to improve the nutrition of the rural poor. At an event held in Parliament by the UK Hunger Alliance on Monday Night, they launched a report which recommended home gardens as one solution fighting malnutrition (Did you know that among children under age five globally, 26 percent of them are stunted in their growth and 16 percent are underweight?). The home gardens supply them with a broader range of nutritious foods such as  leafy vegetables, eggs or poultry meat for their families but also — if there is extra food leftover — they can sell the surplus food to make some extra money.

Dinner

As I sat at the pub with a glass of water in my hand, my friend Emily graciously tried to convince me that her buying me a pint would be the equivalent of a friend or family member helping someone out if they were short on cash one week.  What awesome friends I have, as it wasn’t the first such offer (and a great reminder of the importance of informal “safety nets” for the poor).  But I declined the offer and made my way home to cook dinner.

At a stretch,this recipe is like breakfast for dinner. I boiled some potatoes and mixed them with half a can of baked beans and then dry-fried an egg which went on top along with some more of my fresh chives. It was actually quite good.

Egg baked beans potato_ £1 a day

Thanks for all the nice emails so far.  Feel free to leave comments below as well!